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What do you guys think of this long travel setup?

Discussion in '4th Gen 4Runners (2003-2009)' started by chewyspark, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. Apr 19, 2018 at 12:43 AM
    #1
    chewyspark

    chewyspark [OP] New Member

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    hey yota people!

    Got in touch with one of the guys at MetalTech and he suggested:

    •ICON 2007 - 2009 FJ Cruiser Ext. Travel Front Coilover Shock Kit
    Spring Choice: 650lb Standard springs

    •Metal Tech FJ Cruiser/4Runner Rear Long Travel Suspension - Stage 4
    Options: Heavy Springs w/ ICON 2.0 VS Series Shocks
    Metal Tech FJ Cruiser/4Runner Long Travel Rear Stage 4 Kit includes:

    MT-GSJ-4052 - Metal Tech 4x4 long travel spring x 2

    MT-GSJ-2200 - Metal Tech 4x4 3" bump stop extensions x 2

    CRWN-FJC - Stainless steel extended brake lines x 2

    MT-GSJ-4025 - Metal Tech FJC/4Runner Offset Lower Links x 1


    With total chaos UCAs


    What do you guys think about this setup? Would this be something that could grow with the rig? (Ie drawers, bumpers, gear)

    Im hoping that it can with minimal upgrade in the future.

    I'm pretty sure this setup will put the truck at 3" and I'm planning on getting 32s or 33s, still brainstorming on that, so she'll be sitting pretty at about 4" total

    Any suggested upgrades to other parts, with this setup? As I'm understanding it, a DD isn't necessarily, well necessary lol, upgrading axles and boots are more beneficial...in the long term. Also, anything that could further enhance flex/articulation/ wheel travel?

    this rig won't be a rock crawler but not necessarily a daily driver either. Fortunately, I have access to a work vehicle so the 4Runner is mostly a fishing/hunting/camping in the middle of everywhere overlanding type of rig lol

    Thanks in advance!!
     
  2. Apr 19, 2018 at 8:22 AM
    #2
    JosephMehta

    JosephMehta New Member

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    Shrockworks Front Bumper, CBI Rear Swing Away with dual Jerry Cans and full size spare, Full Shrockworks Armor, Warn 9.5 Synthetic, PIAA Lighting on roof rack and front bumper, Rear lighting wired to vehicle's reverse gear, Dobisons dual slide out rear bay storage with sliding top and refrigerator tie-downs, Limb Risers, Gobi Rack w/mounted Powertank, Fire Extinguisher, Jack, Axe, and Shovel, 33" Nitto Grapplers (295/70/17), Body Mount Chop, Icon Stage 7 Billet w/S2 Stage 3 Secondary adjustable front suspension, 3.5 inch Icon Stage 7 Billet with Billet Upper and Lower Links, Icon Bump Stop, 3.0 inch Icon Overland Rear Coils, ARB Front and Rear Air Locker with ARB Differential Breather (relocated to engine bay), ARB Twin Compressor mounted in engine bay, 360 degree, 4-camera system with DVR with monitor mounted on the dash, Dual Rear Headrest Monitors w/DVD and gaming capability Future mods in 2019: Magnusson Supercharger w/Catback system and possibly an roof mounted, solar heated shower and water storage
    Long travel is a fantastic set-up, but only if you do a lot (emphasis on a lot) of off road; otherwise, it is not worth the expense and the ongoing maintenance at all. And ongoing maintenance long travel needs--it never stops. If you can do the maintenance yourself, you'll save a ton in labor costs, but, if not then you'll be spending money and time at the shop. Long travel will need constant love.
     
  3. Apr 19, 2018 at 8:39 AM
    #3
    chewyspark

    chewyspark [OP] New Member

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    I love wrenching around so no problem there. This is the first Im hearing about this, care to elaborate?

    I can only think of Lubrication?
     
  4. Apr 19, 2018 at 9:19 AM
    #4
    JosephMehta

    JosephMehta New Member

    Joined:
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    Member:
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    Messages:
    118
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    Zombocalypse
    Shrockworks Front Bumper, CBI Rear Swing Away with dual Jerry Cans and full size spare, Full Shrockworks Armor, Warn 9.5 Synthetic, PIAA Lighting on roof rack and front bumper, Rear lighting wired to vehicle's reverse gear, Dobisons dual slide out rear bay storage with sliding top and refrigerator tie-downs, Limb Risers, Gobi Rack w/mounted Powertank, Fire Extinguisher, Jack, Axe, and Shovel, 33" Nitto Grapplers (295/70/17), Body Mount Chop, Icon Stage 7 Billet w/S2 Stage 3 Secondary adjustable front suspension, 3.5 inch Icon Stage 7 Billet with Billet Upper and Lower Links, Icon Bump Stop, 3.0 inch Icon Overland Rear Coils, ARB Front and Rear Air Locker with ARB Differential Breather (relocated to engine bay), ARB Twin Compressor mounted in engine bay, 360 degree, 4-camera system with DVR with monitor mounted on the dash, Dual Rear Headrest Monitors w/DVD and gaming capability Future mods in 2019: Magnusson Supercharger w/Catback system and possibly an roof mounted, solar heated shower and water storage
    LT can cause the front coil buckets amongst many other parts of the truck to flex, bend, and crack. The suspension may be able to handle it, but grill and headlight mounts will also feel the flexing, causing damage; bumper mounts can and will probably break, too. Do not keep your stock spindles and put together solid motor and transmission mounts (all of these things are usually not part of a LT kit install, unless you require the installer to do them). Upgrade any gusseted areas including bolt tabs -- upper and lower; frame gussets. Sure lubrication is necessary, but remember a LT is widening your track by--give or take seven inches--and this is outside of the engineering done on the stock 4runner. Don't undercut the importance of the original engineering gone into the stock truck, it's critical to a Toyota's longevity.

    When it comes to the flex issue with LT and the truck, think of bending a pencil: apply pressure more toward the middle of the pencil, and it won't bend, or hardly at all. You'd have to give it a lot of force to bend or break. Move your fingers to the tip of the pencil, and the eraser of the pencil and it easily bends, and most certainly is much easier to break than if grabbing the pencil in its middle. That's the best analogy I can give, but that's also what occurs to the vehicle. This means that all of those areas that feel the additional flex will eventually weaken and bend/break. Doing the work ahead of time to strengthen flex spots is really critical. In the end LT looks good, and provides functionality off road, which leads back to my main point: spend the money if you are going off road a lot and have the time and dollars for upkeep. Otherwise you may be better off with other mods for the dollars.

    Lastly, I recognize that some of us do upgrades simply for the looks. (No judgment here, and to each their own--I say if it makes you happy, do it.)
     
    COexplorer likes this.
  5. Apr 19, 2018 at 9:42 AM
    #5
    chewyspark

    chewyspark [OP] New Member

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    That's a great analogy! And thanks for taking the time to write up the info.

    All I was looking for was a rig that can get me all over California (and hopefully one day to Alaska :) with the most flex and articulation I could get... do you have some suggestions for what could accomplish that without needing all the extra mods? All I do know is that 9" clearance isn't enough for the trails I want to do. And again, I'm thinking more overlanding than rock crawling, but those California back roads can get nasty after winter... and don't get me wrong I know it's driver skill over mods, I drove a Chevy cobalt into the forests of Siskiyou county lol

    I eventually will have bumpers, winches, armor, drawers and gear in this thing.

    As much as I want my rig to look mean, I ain't in it for the looks or brands, just whatever will be the most beneficial in getting me into some sweet fishing, hunting, camping grounds.
     
  6. Apr 19, 2018 at 10:18 AM
    #6
    JosephMehta

    JosephMehta New Member

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    Shrockworks Front Bumper, CBI Rear Swing Away with dual Jerry Cans and full size spare, Full Shrockworks Armor, Warn 9.5 Synthetic, PIAA Lighting on roof rack and front bumper, Rear lighting wired to vehicle's reverse gear, Dobisons dual slide out rear bay storage with sliding top and refrigerator tie-downs, Limb Risers, Gobi Rack w/mounted Powertank, Fire Extinguisher, Jack, Axe, and Shovel, 33" Nitto Grapplers (295/70/17), Body Mount Chop, Icon Stage 7 Billet w/S2 Stage 3 Secondary adjustable front suspension, 3.5 inch Icon Stage 7 Billet with Billet Upper and Lower Links, Icon Bump Stop, 3.0 inch Icon Overland Rear Coils, ARB Front and Rear Air Locker with ARB Differential Breather (relocated to engine bay), ARB Twin Compressor mounted in engine bay, 360 degree, 4-camera system with DVR with monitor mounted on the dash, Dual Rear Headrest Monitors w/DVD and gaming capability Future mods in 2019: Magnusson Supercharger w/Catback system and possibly an roof mounted, solar heated shower and water storage
    Generally, (given you're not crawling) I'd make sure that I have a good suspension 3-4 inches is all that is really needed in a suspension lift for clearance; anything more and now you have to worry about being too top heavy on the trail. Since you plan on being overland a lot, I'd spend up a little there, including remote reservoirs and heavy duty coils (OME or Toytec Heavy Duty Super Flex are good options here, especially if you add weight like a rear bumper and drawers. And believe me, drawers can be really heavy--adding more than 100 lbs. I have Dobinsons two drawer system and that thing could snap your leg if it fell on you).

    For overland suspension I'd look at Icon Stage 3/4 or better (but more than stage 4 could be overkill, and wallet drain for a similar performance to your needs). For better clearance (re: your 9" reference), I'd think about tire height and the front bumper approach (and clearance) angles more so than I would the suspension (remember, the axles are generally at the same height regardless of what your suspension is; it's the tire height that gives axle clearance, at least for the purpose of this conversation). A front bumper mod can give you by far more of an approach angle for the clearance you need, and, as well, if you put on the one for your needs, you'll have winch space, etc. I've got the Shrockworks front, which dramatically improves the approach angle from stock and gives immediately more approach clearance. As well the bumper has a built in winch spot (internal to the bumper), so that helps for recovery times, looks good, and helps keep the winch from being damaged.

    Also, if you don't have lockers I'd recommend getting at least a rear locker. I installed ARB's rear air locker, and put in a rear differential breather (mounted in the engine). With the locker I mounted, also in the engine compartment) the ARB twin compressor. The compressor runs the locker well, and has the dual purpose to air up tires (or run air tools if you wanted), especially knowing that we need to air down the tires in many overland conditions. The rear locker will be a trail saver for you if you are out a lot; using the rear locker with the ATRAC is a really powerful option for off road and climbing.

    So, the short version is I'd think of:

    1) Tire height
    2) Approach angle - front bumper
    3) Slightly better than middle of the road suspension w/reservoirs
    4) Heavy Duty rear coils
    5) Rear locker w/compressor
     
    kaosonline likes this.
  7. Apr 19, 2018 at 11:54 AM
    #7
    chewyspark

    chewyspark [OP] New Member

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    My thinking was

    1) suspension
    2) tires
    3) armor (front bumper, under armor, rear bumper...in that order)
    4) recovery (I don't plan on going crazy trails by myself or until I have great recovery gear)

    I have about 4600 to spend on suspension/ tires, at least my thinking. What would you do with that budget, starting with a stock '07 sport edition... I am new to all of this.
     
  8. Apr 19, 2018 at 12:16 PM
    #8
    JosephMehta

    JosephMehta New Member

    Joined:
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    Vehicle:
    Zombocalypse
    Shrockworks Front Bumper, CBI Rear Swing Away with dual Jerry Cans and full size spare, Full Shrockworks Armor, Warn 9.5 Synthetic, PIAA Lighting on roof rack and front bumper, Rear lighting wired to vehicle's reverse gear, Dobisons dual slide out rear bay storage with sliding top and refrigerator tie-downs, Limb Risers, Gobi Rack w/mounted Powertank, Fire Extinguisher, Jack, Axe, and Shovel, 33" Nitto Grapplers (295/70/17), Body Mount Chop, Icon Stage 7 Billet w/S2 Stage 3 Secondary adjustable front suspension, 3.5 inch Icon Stage 7 Billet with Billet Upper and Lower Links, Icon Bump Stop, 3.0 inch Icon Overland Rear Coils, ARB Front and Rear Air Locker with ARB Differential Breather (relocated to engine bay), ARB Twin Compressor mounted in engine bay, 360 degree, 4-camera system with DVR with monitor mounted on the dash, Dual Rear Headrest Monitors w/DVD and gaming capability Future mods in 2019: Magnusson Supercharger w/Catback system and possibly an roof mounted, solar heated shower and water storage
    In the order you put them and given the budget:

    1) Suspension -- ICON Stage 1 or Toytec Boss Heavy duty; add either OME or Superflex HD Coils -- about $2,500 installed.
    2) Tires -- a bit of a preference, but the BFG K02s do well both on and off road; certainly there are plenty of good brands. I can't say exactly for your year model, but for mine (2017) and with a 3 inch suspension lift, 275s will not rub, might be able to get away with 285s (assuming 17 inch rim) -- about $1,200
    3) Armor -- I run Shrockworks armor front to back (and from memory) about $1,500 (there are other companies for sure that make armor but SWs uses really thick armor vs. thinner, lighter metal other companies tend to use, but are easier on the pocketbook)
    4) Recovery -- general winch rule is 1.5 x Vehicle Weight. 4 Runners are about 4,500 lbs give/take year model, etc.; so that gets you to ~7000 lbs. of need. I run a Warn 9.5 for 9500 lbs. of capacity -- the Warn 8000 lbs. winch comes closest to the 7000 lbs. rule and runs about $600 before installation; the 9.5 runs about $1,400-1,500 before installation

    *For Front and Rear bumper, there are many options. My suggestion there is to do a lot of research on the different ones (for looks, style, quality, cost). I have the Shrockworks front and CBI Rear Swing Away. Both are handmade, steel; thicker (and heavier) than most. Together, expect to pay about $4,000 give/take. I pulled the bumpers out of the list given the budget you mentioned. There are bumpers that are more cost effective, and with a budget, when it comes time to get the bumper(s) I'd focus first on the front bumper before the rear.

    **Next, consider sliders, too; they are usually not too expensive and will help protect the underside of the vehicle -- plenty to choose from and more of personal preference on looks

    ***I think given that you are new (and learning from my mistakes!) start with suspension and tires. These will give you the most overland return for your dollar.
     
    kaosonline likes this.
  9. Apr 19, 2018 at 4:47 PM
    #9
    alittleoff

    alittleoff New Member

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    As JosephMehta mentioned, having a rear locker is a great suggestion. Also having a front locker will help immensely in the slower speeds of Over landing over ruff ground.
    On my Jeep, I have fr/rr lockers. And along with that, a Currie Anti-Rock set at its loosest settings. On the trails that I frequent, I'm on 3 wheels quite a bit and being locked makes me look like a pro.

    Steve
     
  10. Apr 25, 2018 at 5:38 PM
    #10
    chewyspark

    chewyspark [OP] New Member

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    Ok thanks again for all the info but I may have to put that on hold because
    Just got my car back after bending 6 valves after a timing belt replacement
    Everything was replaced by a mechanic and he's telling me that the ticking I hear will go away after ~300miles of driving because the valves/seals need to seat properly. Because it was sitting for 2 months with no oil running through it all...

    Does this make sense to y'all?
    I also have CEL light and VSC OFF/ VSC TRAC/ abs lights on. I forgot the specific code he told me but he said it had to do with fuel/ air sensor in bank 1. Which was replaced and should go off after awhile too.
     

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