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Swapping Bilstein front shocks for Fox?

Discussion in '5th Gen 4Runners (2010+)' started by M4dm4x, Sep 13, 2020.

  1. Sep 13, 2020 at 6:43 PM
    #1
    M4dm4x

    M4dm4x [OP] New Member

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    Anyone know if on my 2015 Pro, I can just swap out the front shocks currently on it for the new fox shocks? I have a pair at a great price and they are brand new so I figured to install them and leave the Bilstein rear shocks alone?
    Let me know if anyone foresees any issues doing this?
    Thanks
     
  2. Sep 13, 2020 at 6:55 PM
    #2
    Daytonaviolet

    Daytonaviolet TRD Bro

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    Sure why not. But it would be ideal if you can do all 4 corners
     
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  3. Sep 13, 2020 at 6:56 PM
    #3
    M4dm4x

    M4dm4x [OP] New Member

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    Agreed, but the dealer replaced the rear when I purchased the truck in April so those are brand new anyway. Plus I’m only getting the fronts in this deal.
     
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  4. Sep 13, 2020 at 6:58 PM
    #4
    Daytonaviolet

    Daytonaviolet TRD Bro

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    Yes as long as your doing both fronts it should be fine. Personally I got a set of 2018 pro Bilsteins in my limited and it’s awesome. But I wish I was able to find a set of foxs at a good price .. I would of done that instead.
     
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  5. Sep 19, 2020 at 10:14 AM
    #5
    M4dm4x

    M4dm4x [OP] New Member

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    Follow question, anyone in the Albany NY area know a trusted shop that could do the shock swap? Thanks
     
  6. Sep 19, 2020 at 11:48 AM
    #6
    Agent_Outside

    Agent_Outside New Member

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    I wouldn’t mix progressive and degressive valved dampeners.
     
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  7. Sep 19, 2020 at 1:31 PM
    #7
    M4dm4x

    M4dm4x [OP] New Member

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    How come? I’m not an expert at all please let me know
     
  8. Sep 20, 2020 at 7:06 AM
    #8
    kbp810

    kbp810 New Member

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    It will be fine. If you notice any weird handling or annoyances in ride quality between front and rear, then you can always switch the back out later.

    In a nutshell: digressive valving (bilstein), is a stiffer shock, but gets softer as it compresses. This usually means it rides a bit rougher, but offers better handling. Progressive valving is softer, but gets firmer as it compresses. This can mean a softer ride, but sloppier handling. On bigger bumps it might tend to want to sort of jump as opposed to absorb. Note that Fox and king shocks are closer to a linear valving, which is sort of the best aspects of both worlds.

    These are just generalizations though; a lot of other factors come into play; and the average person might not even notice or care about the differences. Especially on road or slow speed Offroad driving.

    You “might” find that the front soaks up small bumps in the road just fine, but then the rear hits and feels rough. If you were driving at faster speeds, especially over rough terrain, you’ll probably find the rear wanting to kick out on you, and that’s a scenario where it’s more important to have matching front and rear.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2020 at 7:14 AM
    M4dm4x [OP] likes this.
  9. Sep 20, 2020 at 7:09 AM
    #9
    M4dm4x

    M4dm4x [OP] New Member

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    This is great info and thanks for explaining it to me!
     
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