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Power loss from larger tires, lift, towing?

Discussion in 'Towing' started by explore22, Jun 8, 2017.

  1. Jun 8, 2017 at 7:54 AM
    #1
    explore22

    explore22 [OP] New Member

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    Ladies and Gentlemen: I'm looking for some advice

    New to the forum...today

    Looking for a new vehicle and 2017 4runner is on the VERY short list. Currently on my fourth pickup truck and looking for a change. My only real concern about the current 4runner is the powertrain. Yea, I know its bombproof and reliable and that's the most important, However, lets be honest, its down on power from where most of us think it should be. I will be towing occasionally (under 3000 lbs.) and will be customizing the rig as well (mild lift 2-3" and probably 285/70/17 tires).
    So my question is, those who have built their Runners on the current powertrain, what have you noticed as far as power loss, drivability etc...? and those of you towing with built rigs...same question. What have you done that has added some power/torque to make up for heavier wheels n tires and other weighty accessories. I know towing is going to impact my MPG, thats a given, as with all vehicles but am currently around 12 mpg towing with my pickup (just a reference point). I have to take long road trips to get to any wheeling locations (live in Illinois). Looked at a dealer built TRD off road 4runner yesterday (Toytec 3", 285/70/17 and winch). I have previously owned two Toyota trucks ('92 Tacoma, '95 T100).

    Thanx for the help.
     
  2. Jun 8, 2017 at 7:58 AM
    #2
    MeefZah

    MeefZah Curmudgeonly

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    Assholes call travel "overlanding"
    You're not going to notice much power loss with the lift and 285s. Towing is a different story. If you tow 3k lbs frequently, get a different truck. If you tow infrequently and short distances then the 4r will be livable.
     
    Bob and jester243 like this.
  3. Jun 8, 2017 at 12:41 PM
    #3
    brochacho

    brochacho New Member

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    Power loss on 285's while noticeable isn't a deal breaker. It was much more noticeable on my Tacoma. I tow a small tent trailer/utility trailer with my 4runner (loaded it's about 2000lbs) and it does fine for the most part...actually much better than my Tacoma did. But most of are trips are relatively short. Loaded rig and trailer with 285's going over mountain ranges isn't very fun though. Like @MeefZah said tough if you are frequently towing 3k+ then you need to be looking at a different rig.

    As far as adding power to these rigs to compensate...really no such thing. CAI's just add noise, no power. Outside of a supercharger (which nobody makes for our rigs yet) we are stuck with what we have.
     
    Bob likes this.
  4. Jun 8, 2017 at 3:38 PM
    #4
    MeefZah

    MeefZah Curmudgeonly

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    Assholes call travel "overlanding"
    Here's a pretty good, and lengthy, thread on towing with the 5th gen:
     
  5. Jun 8, 2017 at 4:35 PM
    #5
    jbrandt

    jbrandt New Member

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    I wouldn't necessarily say that.

    I routinely put 1000's of miles in a short amount of time (road trips) towing a 2500# trailer with my 2004 3.4L Tacoma every summer with the family, and it did just fine. It might have gotten a little slow on some of the steeper hills, but that was mostly because I didn't want to bury the throttle and get negative gas mileage.

    I've since brought a 2017 4Runner and plan to do the exact same thing, without hesitation. My recent trip to the Sierra's shows me the 4.0L is lightyears ahead of the 3.4L, not just because it's 13 years newer. 4Runner hardly noticed the trailer; my wife told me to stop passing people, lol.

    Like with any truck, if you put bigger tires on it, you should re-gear. I run 265/75's (only slightly larger than stock) with stock gears on my Taco and never hesitated towing my trailer. Any bigger than that and I'd strongly consider re-gearing.
     
  6. Jun 8, 2017 at 6:49 PM
    #6
    MeefZah

    MeefZah Curmudgeonly

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    Assholes call travel "overlanding"
    I understand your point but do not agree.

    The 4R, like your 3.4 Taco, is not a great choice for a dedicated towing rig. It's more like a vehicle that can be used to tow, but that's not really it's forte. If OP is looking to buy a truck and he knows he wants to routinely tow 3k lbs then he should look elsewhere, I think. If OP wants a 4R and plans on infrequently using it to tow then that's a different story, and I say get a 4R.
     
    brochacho likes this.
  7. Jun 9, 2017 at 9:06 AM
    #7
    jbrandt

    jbrandt New Member

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    A dedicated towing rig? Sure, I'll give you that, but very few people actually have *dedicated* tow rigs unless they haul a 20,000# toy hauler, have money coming out their ears to be able to afford *another* vehicle, or maybe live on a farm.

    Heck, if all you're towing is 3000# a couple times a year over short distances, get a 10 year old 5 speed 4cyl. That'll get the job done, and on the cheap, too.

    People use their rig for all kinds of things, so I guess it depends on your definition of "infrequent." For me, I infrequently tow during winter (maybe a couple times), but very frequently tow in the summer/fall, typically over long distances (5k+ miles throughout the summer), and my 3.4L never complained.

    But, since the OP said he'd be occasionally towing 3000#, I think he's sound as a pound with the 4Runner.
     
  8. Jun 9, 2017 at 4:00 PM
    #8
    glandnut

    glandnut Reserve Collection Squirrel Hair

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    I have an Aliner loaded up that weighs about 2500lbs and 200lbs tongue weight. Trailer brake controller and a mindful balanced load and your golden.
     
    jbrandt likes this.
  9. Jun 10, 2017 at 12:27 PM
    #9
    fajitas21

    fajitas21 New Member

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    I towed a 1500# home made trailer (low profile) 2,000 miles in 2 weeks time during out Texas > Arkansas > Tennessee > Mississippi Trip. About 3 months later, with the lift and tires, towed it 800 miles in a weekend. Because of it's low profile, I virtually took no MPG loss, maybe 1 MPG?

    A travel trailer that is higher than the truck or wider than the truck, that' a completely different kind of stress on the truck, and your drivetrain will really feel it, even if it is only 2000#. An aerodynamic 4000# trailer, probably would do better than a 2000# brick.

    Weight isn't the only factor, it just matters when you're starting and stopping it. Pulling it down the road is what's going to make that 3000# seem like a slam dunk or a terrible idea.
     
    brochacho likes this.
  10. Jun 10, 2017 at 9:02 PM
    #10
    brochacho

    brochacho New Member

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    Well said.
     
  11. Jun 11, 2017 at 8:11 AM
    #11
    j cat

    j cat New Member

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    the 4runner does have a power problem with the V6 4L engine. it has a torque shift issue. My 2016 when compared to my 2000 5.3L GM truck 170K miles it is soo much more on power. the T4R has a narrow toque band .. so on hills here , it does down shifts from 5th to 4th too much IMO,,.. the old GM truck just does not do it.

    Toyota says 5K lbs is the vehicles tow capacity but perhaps on flat lands it is possible.

    when the air temps surge to 90 F plus and your towing and hauling to some camp site with these conditions , you must install , the much larger tranny fluid cooler. reason is the engine temps will then be kept lower , so with that lower more power ..

    the air filter is quite restrictive as OEM built. designed for OFF road use in high dust areas .. like a desert .. when towing you want greater air flow , because the engine will require much more air than with NO loads..

    install of the CAI for summer tow use is another good change.. IMO remove it when cold winter arrives .. then install again as the tow season begins in the hot weather..
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2017
  12. Jun 12, 2017 at 7:37 PM
    #12
    advtex

    advtex New Member

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    I'm in the exact same position and for that reason will not be lifting my 2016 SR5 4RUNNER or putting bigger tires. I tow a 2500# toy hauler camper and I just about traded my 4Runner in after my first tow around the Texas hill country. The suspension sag, poor braking, and lack of power was very noticeable. Adding Timbren suspension bumper stops and a Tekonsha brake controller made a world of difference in handling and braking to the point where my 5th Gen is a decent weekend tow vehicle (think C+ on a grade scale). I don't want to upset that progress by adding bigger tires and a lift. I guess for my use towing capability matters more to me than improved off-road prowess.
     
    j cat likes this.
  13. Jun 13, 2017 at 8:03 AM
    #13
    brochacho

    brochacho New Member

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    Can I ask why you went with Timbren's versus air bags? I am tying to decide between the 2 currently...
     
  14. Jun 13, 2017 at 8:08 PM
    #14
    advtex

    advtex New Member

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    I wanted to keep it simple and felt the timbren stops were less likely to fail. It took me all of 30 minutes to install if that. Really happy with the difference they made in towability.

    Here are the ones I bought.

    https://www.etrailer.com/Vehicle-Su...er/2016/TABSTORSEQ.html?vehicleid=20164047284
     
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