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Cost of brakes

Discussion in '3rd Gen 4Runners (1996-2002)' started by Trekker, Mar 21, 2021.

  1. Mar 21, 2021 at 10:07 PM
    #1
    Trekker

    Trekker [OP] Regular Member

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    I have reached the tang on my brakes, so now they squeal like hell when I use them telling me in the most painful way possible that its time to get new pads. I would likely go OEM so they will last. I haven't gotten the chance to check if it is the front discs or rear drum brakes, so estimations for either set is fine.

    What can I expect to pay to get them done by an independent shop using OEM pads?

    Is this a job that should or could be done by someone who only has jack stands and basic tools (ratchets, wrenches, etc.)? If you've done this job (on either front or rear brakes), how long did it take you?
     
  2. Mar 21, 2021 at 10:42 PM
    #2
    negusm

    negusm New Member

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    If you can get the wheel off, then you can do these yourself.

    The only hard part is pushing in the caliper piston back in... I either use a wood clamp or this:

    https://www.amazon.com/Segomo-Tools...d=1616390858&sr=8-2-spons&smid=A16WACRYX3G7V0

    The only thing else that is needed is a good solid 1/2" ratchet with metric sockets and a small/medium extension, need nose pliers and screw drivers/pokey things.

    You do NOT have to disconnect any brake lines or anything...just get a box/upside down bucket to rest the caliper on when you need to. Don't let it hang and pull on the rubber brake line.

    Remove wheel, unbolt the bracket connecting the brake line to the steering knuckle, unbolt the caliper top and bottom bolts, twist it away from the rotor, remove the pads (watch how the metal wire retainer goes in)....and then just reverse the process after you use the above tool to push the caliper cylinder back into the caliper. I've done every last brake job on my rig since I bought her new in 2002. Plenty of youtube videos also.

    Highly unlikely it's the rear drums you hear. But if you have 150k+ on those...better plan on those next. Mine went a full 150k miles and when I changed them they could have gone a bit farther. Rear brake shoes take very little of the wear. Rear drums are another kind of pain. I can do them using standard tools...and some finaggling but I've also done a few drum setups here and there and never look forward to them. They fight you. Also, never had the drums wear out...just the shoes do.

    Edit: This holds true only if NO RUST is involved. Also, you're supposed to torque the caliper bolts, etc and I don't. I was just never taught that it mattered. You were supposed to know how tight "tight" was supposed to be so shit didn't fall off your car :)

    Also...if you want to replace the entire rotor, you can do that too. Once the caliper is off, the rotor, just pops off.

    -Mike
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2021
    Trekker [OP] likes this.
  3. Mar 22, 2021 at 1:28 PM
    #3
    PhantomTweak

    PhantomTweak New Member

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    Patrick
    OREGON
    Vehicle:
    1987 4Runner all stock, owned 32 years
    None. Bone Stock. EXCEPT: Brushguard, tow hitch, both welded to the frame. It's good to have friends and a fully equipped garage!
    I second Mike's post. I've done the pads on both my trucks, and I did the shoes on my 87 4Runner.
    Mike's right. Drum brakes fight you every second of the evolution. I think malicious spirits are inserted in them at the factory, I really do. The pads take me about an hour for both sides, the drums took me 4 hours or so. Nasty things. Malicious, I swear.
    For spreading the calipers I use the handle of a regular ball peen hammer. Works great for me. Alternatively, I have used my 1/2" drive breaker bar, wrapped in a few layers of electrical tape.
    ONLY spread one caliper at a time, or you'll watch one side close down as you spread the other. Pointless. Leave the other side on the brake's rotor until you're ready to work on it.
    Beware, when you spread the calipers, the brake fluid will rise in the reservoir. Be alert for an overflow from the reservoir. Suck some out if you need to. You can use a turkey baster, or large syringe to draw some fluid out. Do NOT let the reservoir get so low air can get into the master cylinder. Keep as much fluid in as the whole process will allow.

    While you're doing, after you get done with the pads and shoes, it's a real good time to bleed the brake system. Remember, brake fluid absorbs moisture over time. You need to change it out completely every other year or so. Start at the passenger side rear, then driver's side rear, passenger side front, driver side front, LPSV. In that order. DO NOT neglect doing the LPSV. It matters as much as the rest.
    Drain each one until you get clean fluid out, with no air bubbles. Make sure you keep the master cylinder filled as you go. Do NOT let it get low enough to suck air, or you get to start all over. You'll refill it often. Keep close watch on it.

    When you do the road test, remember to "bed" the new pads. From highway speed, step hard on the brakes. If you don't have ABS, don't lock up the tires when you step on the brakes. Just try to slow from 60 or so to about 20 as fast and hard as you can without breaking traction. Do this 3 or 4 times, and you're good to go. You can google "Bedding brake pads", no quotes, and get tons of information, if you so desire.

    It's really not all that hard to do the pads. Just dive in and DO it. After the first set, you'll be a pro.
    Good luck!
    Pat☺
     
    negusm likes this.
  4. Mar 23, 2021 at 10:35 AM
    #4
    negusm

    negusm New Member

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    So...just for a bit of alternative perspective...the brake fluid in my car is original from the Toyota factory in Japan. Never in 19 years has the system been bled. I have added a small bit once or twice to the resevoir.

    I know I am the extreme other end of the spectrum here. I have plans to flush/change the fluid and replace all rubber brake lines and rebuild the calipers...but she stops fine still, has no leaks and I'm lazy.

    Changing it every two years is way over kill. Changing it after 20...not smart, I'll own that.

    I look at it like this...new cars are owned 12 years on average now and you know the number of people that get their brake fluid change are probably nil. Not a lot of people complaining of brake fluid issues. So I would recommend a fluid swap more like every 5-10 years.

    I hate to say but I've driven cars with 30-40 year old fluid in it for years...until the metal line rots away from said moisture getting in and the pedal gets a bit squishy. Old Fords are fun.
     
  5. Mar 23, 2021 at 11:42 AM
    #5
    PhantomTweak

    PhantomTweak New Member

    Joined:
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    First Name:
    Patrick
    OREGON
    Vehicle:
    1987 4Runner all stock, owned 32 years
    None. Bone Stock. EXCEPT: Brushguard, tow hitch, both welded to the frame. It's good to have friends and a fully equipped garage!
    The only "old Ford" I ever got to drive was my father's 1932 Model A Coupe Special. It has 2 spares on the running boards instead of just one. That's what makes it "Special".
    Long story. He bought it when HE was in the Navy, A Flight Instructor in the old SNJ's. You know the planes. They use them in the movies to play Japanese Zeros. My father was transferring from Corpus Christi to Miramar. Going through the mountains between Yuma and San Diego, he saw this car coming the other way. He and his friend pulled over, and for a joke, asked the man driving how much he wanted for it. They guy looked like he was the original owner, he was so old. This was back in the early 50's, BTW.
    The old guy told my father to give him $10.00 and it was his. Still thinking the old guy was kidding him, my father gave him a $10.00 bill. The old guy filled out the title right there, turned around and walked away the way he came.
    After my father got out of the Navy, he went to work as a pilot of United. Back when flying was a class experience. I even remember being able to smoke on the planes! Anywho, my father settled in the SF Bay Area, and drove the Model A back and forth to the airport. If you were to see it, you could still see the UAL parking sticker in it.
    Before I really got to driving, though, he parked it in the garage. It became nothing more than a pile of "stuff" in the garage. I did get to drive it on the property a few times though. Very fun.

    Maybe I'm too cautious about brake fluid, but I know everything I've read says to replace it regularly. About every 2 or 3 years, IIRC. With brakes, I'd rather be safe than sorry. I would HATE to push the pedal have nothing happen. THAT terrifies me. Call me a coward, but I've managed to live this long (60 years so far) being cautious. Works good for ME! :D

    Have fun, y'all!
    Pat☺
     

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