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Tire Rotation - Easiest Method for DIY?

Discussion in '5th Gen 4Runners (2010-2024)' started by legend1011, Jun 10, 2024.

  1. Jun 10, 2024 at 11:19 PM
    #1
    legend1011

    legend1011 [OP] New Member

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    This past weekend, I did my first break-in oil change at 780 miles. Since it was my first oil change on any new car and on a Toyota ever, I definitely took my time with it and torqued everything down correctly (new OEM oil filer, new OEM plug gasket, Toyota 0w20 Oil). I elected to not go with a Fumoto/Valvomax and stick with the OEM oil plug for the time being. I also used the recommended MotivX tools and I'm glad I did - I'm confident that oil changes will go smoothly and faster going forward (Skid plate was interesting, but I digress).

    Planning ahead, I will be doing the tire rotation once I hit 5k. What is the easiest method for one to do this in their driveway? I am open to purchasing any tools that I don't have for this. I don't have access to a lift and will be doing this in my driveway:
    1) Good quality jack / jack stands - I have a lower profile craftsman jack that may need to be upgraded. I also have 2 2 ton jack stands

    2) Impact wrench for loosening bolts? - I have a 21 Gallon compressor, but no impact wrench or impact sockets. It seems like this a good thing to have for this job.

    3) Torque Wrench - I want to torque everything down correctly. I purchased a lower pound per foot ICON torque wrench for lower torque settings, but I am considering getting another one specifically for tires.

    Besides the tools... What is the best technique/method to do this job as quickly and efficiently as possible? Should the Spare tire be included in this rotation process? Is there a preferred tire rotation pattern that should be followed on the 5th gen?

    Sorry for any rookie questions. I have rotated tires on other vehicles, but not as often as I should have. I plan on doing this regularly every 5,000 miles on this 5th gen and don't want to turn this into an all day job (if at all possible). More importantly, I want it done right and with the right tools.

    I appreciate any help with this. Thank you!
     
  2. Jun 11, 2024 at 2:59 AM
    #2
    Spare Parts

    Spare Parts New Member

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    I take my spare down, check it out then put that on passenger rear as a place holder. I just use a floor jack, like I would to change a tire. Where you rotate may be different, but I go Rear Passenger to Driver Front to Driver Rear to Passenger Front and then back to Passenger Rear. Some just go front to rear.
     
    legend1011[OP] and alittleoff like this.
  3. Jun 11, 2024 at 4:25 AM
    #3
    2020 4Runner

    2020 4Runner New Member

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    I have 2 of these jacks that I use being that i have the 4R and the Tundra....makes life easy. Lowes often has the Craftmen 1/2 inch torque wrench on sale.
     
  4. Jun 11, 2024 at 4:48 AM
    #4
    Thatbassguy

    Thatbassguy New member? Really??

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    My method usually goes pretty smoothly:

    -Raised the front end and put on jack stands. Make sure to leave a little extra clearance, because when you lift the rear, the fronts will come down a bit.

    -put the jack under the rear diff, and raise it just enough to get the tires off the ground. You could use jack stands here also, if you prefer. And, you should use jack stands if you're planning on going underneath the vehicle for any reason.

    -then based on your chosen pattern, remove the first tire and roll it to its new location. Remove that tire, and install the first tire. Roll the second tire to its new location, repeat.

    -I usually get the lugs finger tight all around, then snug them gently with an impact on the low setting. You could use your lug wrench also, I'm just lazy.

    -once every tire is back on, lower the rear axle, then the front, and torque all of the lugs. I usually take it for a quick ride and then re-torque everything.


    Also, an impact makes it so much easier an faster. As you mentioned, you don't want to tighten them with an impact. I just use a quick touch of the trigger and that's it. They don't get really tight, just snug.

    Air impacts are fine. But, if you have decent 18V cordless tools already, most major brands have a cordless impact that can remove lugs. This is way more convenient than running an air hose and a compressor, in my opinion. But, can be fairly expensive if you don't already have cordless tools that you can share batteries with.
     
  5. Jun 11, 2024 at 7:06 AM
    #5
    catbrown357

    catbrown357 New Member

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    ^^This is the way^^ Only thing I would add is if you have a matching wheel that's on the spare, rotate that in, and check all air pressures. Honestly the hardest part about this is finding the notch to lower the spare tire! Once you do it a few times, it becomes easy. I'm amazed at how many people have never even touched their spare tire.
     
  6. Jun 11, 2024 at 7:20 AM
    #6
    scottiezilla

    scottiezilla New Member

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    I think bout this all the time
    Especially when I see jeeps, older rav4s, broncos…anything with an exposed spare
    Changing a tire NEEDS to be common knowledge n I’ve helped enough people that don’t have a clue
    I did a dry run on changing the 4Rs tire the day I got it n you’re right, that notch is a frickin unicorn
     
  7. Jun 11, 2024 at 7:56 AM
    #7
    Thatbassguy

    Thatbassguy New member? Really??

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    Good point! Mine comes down whenever I get super muddy. And, I keep the summer spare inside the cargo area, so the hoist gets cycled fairly regularly.
     
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  8. Jun 11, 2024 at 8:10 AM
    #8
    whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 New Member

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    I'd get a breaker bar for loosening the lugs because an impact will mushroom them over time. I have a HF cheapy and a Cornwell. Not sure how close you are to the ground but possibly look into a https://www.liftwithtrac.com/products/trac-tire-jack to save your back.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2024
  9. Jun 11, 2024 at 8:14 AM
    #9
    Lost Woods

    Lost Woods New Member

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    First rule for me as a former tech is no impact tools... Too many "chrome" lugs are just caps over steel that will deform which makes getting a socket on them a pain in the ass over time. Toyota isn't as bad as say FCA, but it happens eventually. Plated ones will chip and rust and look like shit so best to do those the same way.

    Break them loose with a breaker bar while on the ground, jack, then remove with an old school speed handle. Reinstall in the reverse.

    spare > passenger front > passenger rear > driver front > driver rear > spare

    It's just moving the tire one spot so you can do it one at a time with 3 on the ground for safety if you prefer and you realistically don't need more than the jack. Just don't be stupid with where you put your body parts just in case it fails.

    Always do your full-size spare. It forces you to keep it reasonably aired up and it's 20% more miles out of the set of tires.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2024
    Stoney Ranger and legend1011[OP] like this.
  10. Jun 11, 2024 at 8:19 AM
    #10
    Thatbassguy

    Thatbassguy New member? Really??

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    I've never actually seen this happen. However, it does eventually take the paint off, if your lugs are painted.
     
  11. Jun 11, 2024 at 8:21 AM
    #11
    whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 New Member

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    Happened to my Tacoma after years of me and the tire shop using an impact. Sockets were a pain to get on so I ordered all new lugs from Toyota.
     
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  12. Jun 11, 2024 at 8:31 AM
    #12
    Thatbassguy

    Thatbassguy New member? Really??

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    Weird. I wonder if the spline lugs just hold up better. Mine have been rotated about the equivalent of 10 years worth of driving for the average person.
     
  13. Jun 11, 2024 at 8:56 AM
    #13
    whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 New Member

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    Maybe my electric set to max power is to blame. Well there's no power setting on it so you just get all of it.
     
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  14. Jun 11, 2024 at 8:56 AM
    #14
    Spare Parts

    Spare Parts New Member

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    I keep mine in the rear pocket with the spare tire rod stuff.
     
  15. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:01 AM
    #15
    jgalt

    jgalt New Member

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    For the OCD types, torque w/ the tires off the ground, using a "chock" to prevent rotation. This helps minimize eccentricity. I let the rubber almost touch the floor, and then use a 4x4 block held in place by my foot to prevent rotation. I think Coscto uses a more sophisticated toothed/curved metal chock.
     
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  16. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:01 AM
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    Lost Woods

    Lost Woods New Member

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    In regards to wear they typically do because the force is spread out over all the splines and not just 6 faces. The socket, on the other hand, is far more likely to crack.
     
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  17. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:04 AM
    #17
    legend1011

    legend1011 [OP] New Member

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    I like the idea of keeping the spare in the rotation. This will force me to not get cheap when it's time to replace all the tires and I'll do all 5.

    I do think it's time for a more heavy duty jack. The one I have has been fine for my old Honda, but I could benefit from a higher quality one.
     
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  18. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:06 AM
    #18
    whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 New Member

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    I was thinking about getting a Gorilla brand extendable lug wrench for both cars and either a cheap torque wrench or this Michael Pro wrench for both. Not like I'm constantly changing tires but anything to make the job easier.
     
  19. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:08 AM
    #19
    legend1011

    legend1011 [OP] New Member

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    On a related note for OCD types, how does one deal with tire techs when you have the tires replaced? Ideally, I would be in the shop with them torquing everything down correctly vs the impact tightening method they use...

    For what it's worth, last summer my mother in law almost lost a wheel because the tech (Big-O Tires) over-torqued all of her new tires to her truck. 3 of the 5 studs broke off on one wheel and we had to get the car towed to resolve :mad:
     
  20. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:17 AM
    #20
    jeepster09

    jeepster09 Re-Member

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    A work in progress.....
  21. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:26 AM
    #21
    jgalt

    jgalt New Member

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    I believe Costoc still hand torques. The rest are usually full send.
     
  22. Jun 11, 2024 at 9:38 AM
    #22
    kmeeg

    kmeeg New Member

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    Owners manual and service manual your friend.
    upload_2024-6-11_10-38-29.png
    upload_2024-6-11_10-41-2.png
     
  23. Jun 11, 2024 at 10:06 AM
    #23
    Spare Parts

    Spare Parts New Member

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    So the tires (p245/60r20) on the passenger side don’t get equal miles?
     
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  24. Jun 11, 2024 at 10:13 AM
    #24
    kmeeg

    kmeeg New Member

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    Not sure whats the reasoning by 4Runner engineers to do it that way on 20in vs 4 tire rotation method in 17in options.
     
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  25. Jun 11, 2024 at 10:43 AM
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    jgalt

    jgalt New Member

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    The 20's are on Limiteds which are AWD. More important to have even tire diameters on torsen central diffs.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2024
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  26. Jun 11, 2024 at 10:55 AM
    #26
    Lost Woods

    Lost Woods New Member

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    Yeah it's an AWD thing... a 4 tire is "standard" (mostly because nothing has a full spare) but a 5-tire ensures equal wear. The pattern you use doesn't matter as long as you stick with it every rotation, don't re-use the front tires in a front position twice, and use a pattern that gets every tire into every position at some point. Just do it at least every 5k and earlier with aggressive tires if you notice cupping.

    I would not recommend what was posted above from the service manual. Yeah, Toyota said it, but Toyota isn't warrantying your tires and any decent tire shop will recommend what I'm saying.
     
  27. Jun 11, 2024 at 11:40 AM
    #27
    backpacker

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    I do one side at a time using floor lift and jackstands, lifting as little as possible off the ground. I use an impact wrench to break and remove lug nuts. Mounting tires is hardest for me. I try to get the holes lined up, then lie down and assisting my arms with one thigh, get one stud through a hole and rotate with mostly thigh pressure until they all catch. After mounting tires in their new positions, I hand-twist the lug nuts almost all the way, frequently rocking the tire to get each nut perfectly seated. I finish up with the torque wrench.
     
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  28. Jun 11, 2024 at 12:19 PM
    #28
    Thatbassguy

    Thatbassguy New member? Really??

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    I use the big bertha Milwaukee to take mine out, though. 1400 LB/FT of nut busting madness!
     
  29. Jun 11, 2024 at 12:31 PM
    #29
    backpacker

    backpacker New Member

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    After three tire rotations, I don't see much damage to the lug nuts. I'm diligent about keeping the socket aligned as straight as possible from start to finish.
     
  30. Jun 11, 2024 at 12:32 PM
    #30
    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson New Member

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    Two items that are game changers when rotating tires. Two floor jacks and a battery powered impact wrench. You’ll be changing tires as fast as a nascar pit crew.
     
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